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Russian sanctions prompt tech to stop sales, curb services

Tech companies responding to the war in Ukraine and U.S. economic sanctions imposed on Russia are halting product sales, limiting services, giving up revenue and hurting Russia’s access to advanced tech.

Google, Apple, Microsoft, Oracle, Dell and Meta are among the firms announcing changes to their business plans in Russia in response to the country’s invasion of Ukraine, sanctions and the urging of one of Ukraine’s top officials.

Google cut off ad revenue to Russian-backed state media outlets and increased security measures for Ukrainian users and websites through expansion of its Project Shield campaign. Apple and Microsoft paused new product sales in Russia. Oracle and SAP suspended operations in Russia, and Meta restricted access to Russian state-controlled media outlets Russia Today and Sputnik. According to market research firm IDC, Russia’s total Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) spending in 2021 was about $50 billion.

“Like the rest of the world, we are horrified, angered and saddened by the images and news coming from the war in Ukraine and condemn this unjustified, unprovoked and unlawful invasion by Russia,” said Brad Smith, Microsoft president and vice chair, in a statement.

Economic sanctions imposed by the U.S. on Russia are also causing U.S. companies like VMware as well as the German enterprise software firm SAP to pause some of their services to the country, including stopping new sales transactions with sanctioned Russian customers.

Tech firms are also being urged by Mykhailo Fedorov, Ukraine’s vice prime minister and minister of digital transformation, to step up pressure on Russia. He has mounted a vigorous social media campaign aimed at U.S. tech companies and believes they need to do more in response to Russia’s aggression.

Fedorov’s push to stop tech companies’ services to Russia

Fedorov is calling out large tech companies on social media and asking for their support by stopping operations, product sales and services to Russia.

Apple was one of many companies Fedorov singled out on Twitter, noting that he had contacted Apple CEO Tim Cook asking him to support U.S. sanctions against Russia and block the company’s App Store for Russian residents. Though the company stopped product sales, it has not blocked App Store access in Russia.

“No more @Apple product sales in Russia!” Fedorov tweeted. “Now @tim_cook, let’s finish the job and block @AppStore access in Russia. They kill our children, now kill their access!”

Fedorov also used social media to ask SpaceX CEO Elon Musk to activate Starlink satellite internet service in Ukraine, which Musk did.

Company Status
ADP Doesn’t serve clients headquartered in Russia; serves clients in Russia, Ukraine
AMD*    Sanctions prevent chip sales
Apple*  

Suspended product sales; limited services

Aruba Suspended shipments
Cisco

Suspended business operations in Russia, Belarus

Dell* Suspended product sales
Epicor* Suspended product sales, operations
Google* Suspended ad revenue for Russian-backed state media; limited services
Hitachi Vantara* CEO: It will “monitor events” and “provide updates as the situation develops”
HP* Suspended shipments; halted advertising
IBM*     Told employees it is “monitoring the situation” in a March 2 memo
Intel* Sanctions prevent chip sales; suspended sales
Meta Restricted access to Russian-backed state media
Micron Halted all shipments to Russia and Ukraine
Microsoft* Suspended new products, services sales
Oracle* Suspended sales, operations
Pure Storage*   

Suspended shipments in support services

SAP* Suspended sales
SAS Suspended all business operations in Russia
Seagate

“Closely monitoring” developments and U.S.-related sanctions

Supermicro Paused all its sales and shipments to Russia
Veeam* Suspended sales
VMware* Suspended sales/support to sanctioned customers; blocked license delivery to partners
Workday Does not sell products or services in Russia

* Has offices in Russia

ERP companies respond at Fedorov’s urging

On Wednesday, ERP giants SAP and Oracle suspended all operations in Russia, in response to a direct appeal from Fedorov. 

“Economic sanctions against Russia are an important mechanism in the efforts to restore peace. We are in constant exchange with governments around the world, have every confidence in their guidance, and fully support the actions taken so far,” said SAP CEO Christian Klein in a blog post on Wednesday. “We are stopping business in Russia aligned with sanctions and, in addition, pausing all sales of SAP services and products in Russia.” 

In a tweet, Fedorov thanked SAP for stopping sales in Russia, but argued that it was not enough.

“We ask you to stop support of SAP products as long as Russian tanks and missiles attack Ukraine,” he tweeted.

It’s unclear how much business SAP does in Russia, but in 2018 the Germany-based ERP giant opened the SAP Experience Center Moscow to help develop SAP applications for customers in the Russian market. At the time, SAP reported having 1,600 customers and 1,300 employees in Russia. One of these customers is Gazprom, the giant energy conglomerate based in St. Petersburg. 

SAP’s move to suspend new business in Russia is largely symbolic and is not likely to affect the company’s bottom line, said Joshua Greenbaum, principal with Enterprise Applications Consulting in Berkeley, Calif. 

It’s a good start, he said, but it may be a little easier than it seems for SAP to do because Russia’s economy is not that big. 

“There are probably not huge amounts of revenue at stake relative to most, if not all, other European countries,” Greenbaum said. “It’s tricky, but I think you have to do something, and they did. It’s a symbolic gesture but it’s symbolism that matters.”  

It’s a complicated balancing act for SAP because it must take into account how the move will affect its Russian customers, partners and employees, he said. 

“I don’t think SAP will take a financial hit per se, so it’s probably not a very big deal,” Greenbaum said. “But it’s real and it’s something that SAP is going to have to monitor very closely because it may change on a daily basis.” 

The impact on Russia as companies stop services

As companies respond to Fedorov’s calls for aid and Russian sanctions, the country is likely to experience a hit to its ability to produce vital technologies, said Charlotte Newton, analyst at market research firm GlobalData.

Newton said the most notable hindrance for Russia and its ability to procure vital technologies is limitations on acquiring Taiwanese semiconductors.

“Without access to those, Russia is limited in its ability to manufacture military equipment and basic devices such as laptops and smartphones,” she said.

Without access to [Taiwanese semiconductors], Russia is limited in its ability to manufacture military equipment and basic devices such as laptops and smartphones.
Charlotte NewtonAnalyst, GlobalData

Companies such as Apple and Google pausing certain services will have a more significant impact on Russia’s infrastructure, she said.

The effects are already being felt in Russia. Huge queues were seen in Moscow subways because people were unable to pay for tickets with Apple Pay on their iPhones, Newton said. Along with halting product sales, Apple has limited services in Russia, including Apple Pay and Apple Maps.

Google also limited its Google Pay services, meaning several banks in Russia are unable to work with Google Pay and Apple Pay due to the financial sanctions, Newton said.

“While Russia represents only 2% of iPhone sales for Apple, the limits on Apple Pay will impact banks operating in Russia reliant on online transactions,” she said.

While these companies wield a significant amount of global power, Newton said it’s important not to overstate the companies’ influences, as their response likely won’t “shift the needle” on Putin’s resolve to annex Ukraine.

“If the likes of Meta and Apple leave the country, they will probably be replaced by Russian alternatives, widening the gulf between Russia and the rest of the world. However, the extent to which the Kremlin can create its own version of the internet, Runet, will depend on the available resources.”

HR firms respond to Ukraine crisis

ADP, a global HR provider, in response to a query about the Ukraine situation and its work in Russia, issued a statement: “ADP provides HR and payroll solutions to clients around the world. We can confirm that ADP services clients in both Russia and Ukraine, however, we do not serve any clients that are headquartered in Russia.”

“We are keenly focused on our preparedness efforts to sustain our business operations and maintain compliance for our clients across the globe,” ADP wrote. “We are assessing any potential impact that may result from sanctions levied by the U.S., the EU, and other countries on our relationships with clients and vendors. We are committed to remaining compliant with all laws and regulations,” ADP said in its statement.

In a blog post it published Thursday, Workday said that it “does not currently sell its products or services in Russia and we have no plans to do so. And while we do not have any full-time employees in Russia or Ukraine, we do have a contingent workforce in Ukraine that we’re continuing to support.”

Although Workday isn’t selling products or services in Russia, it may have users in that country. Its website lists Unistaff Payroll Co., with offices in Russia, as a partner. “Unistaff and Workday deliver solutions to synchronize data using Unistaff Connectors. Together our partnership provides a secure solution for Workday customers in Russia,” the partner description said.

Workday also said it will help financially in relief efforts. The firm “will provide $500,000 in cash support with a $250,000 donation and $250,000 match in employee contributions.” The money will go to relief organizations, including “a stipend to any employee who is opening up their home to refugees from Ukraine.”

Makenzie Holland is a news writer covering big tech and federal regulation. Prior to joining TechTarget, she was a general reporter for the Wilmington StarNews and a crime and education reporter at the Wabash Plain Dealer.

News writers Adam Armstrong, Eric Avidon, Tim McCarthy, Madelaine Millar and Ed Scannell contributed to this report.

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Partnering with newcomer communities leads to thousands of vaccinations in Calgary area | News

UCalgary researchers credit their strong relationship with community partners as a key factor that led to a successful COVID-19 vaccination program among newcomers in Calgary. Drs. Gabriel Fabreau, MD, and Annalee Coakley, MD, and their team delivered approximately 12,200 vaccinations across 13 urban and rural clinics in and around Calgary. This includes four large meat processing facilities that reached an 85 per cent worker vaccination rate and outreach clinics in Calgary’s northeast that helped the Upper NE achieve 100 per cent first dose uptake.

“The vaccination clinics were the start of a long-term partnership for us,” says Adanech Sahilie from the Immigrant Outreach Society and Refugee Health YYC research team member who was one of many community partners involved. “Because of the clinics we now have a relationship with the workers at the meat plants, and they know they can reach out to us on many issues. This type of collaboration has huge impact.”

The effort, led by the Centre for Newcomers Calgary, co-ordinated many social agencies that were key in the success of the project including the Alberta International Medical Graduates Association, Action Dignity and the Calgary Immigrant Women’s Association. Health-care partnerships included Calgary Zone Primary Care Networks, the refugee clinic through Mosaic Primary Care Network, Highland and Rural Primary Care Networks, the Alberta Health Services design lab and Alberta Health.

“What we learned from mitigating the outbreaks at the meat packing plants was that addressing social barriers was critical to providing clinical care,” says Coakley, physician lead at the Mosaic Refugee Health Clinic, principal investigator on the project and clinical assistant professor at the University of Calgary’s Cumming School of Medicine.

By removing barriers to vaccine access, such as hosting a vaccine clinic at a convenient location, without needing to book an appointment, and staffed by people from diverse backgrounds who could answer questions in first language, we were able to achieve high uptake of vaccine in vulnerable communities.

Coakley is part of Fabreau’s research team, which also includes Drs. Kevin Pottie and Denise Spitzer, is one of three UCalgary COVID-19 research projects that received CIHR Operating Grant: Emerging COVID-19 Research Gaps and Priorities funding for a collective total of $1.4 million.

“We are committed to getting all Canadians through the COVID-19 pandemic safely. These new research projects will provide evidence to guide our efforts in addressing the needs of communities who continue to experience disproportionate impacts from the pandemic while ensuring that our health care works for everyone,” says Jean-Yves Duclos, minister of health.

Research projects’ potential for rapid impact

“These COVID-19 research projects have the potential for rapid impact on the well-being of Canadians from vulnerable populations and equity-deserving groups,” says Dr. William Ghali, MD, Vice-President (Research). “CIHR’s continued support for research on this topic will enable us to improve how we prevent, treat, and manage COVID-19, as well as other public health risks in the future.”

There are several socio-economic barriers that keep racialized communities and newcomers from vaccination clinics. The most successful strategy was to improve access through pop-up clinics in the communities and workplaces where newcomers live and work. Secondly, to engage directly with communities, address their concerns and provide resources to combat vaccine misinformation in their communities.

As the next step in their work, researchers will participate in knowledge engagement strategies to help other vulnerable communities across Alberta to improve vaccination rates.

Projects  funded through CIHR Operating Grant

Gabriel Fabreau, Kevin Pottie, Annalee Coakley and Denise Spitzer,
University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine, O’Brien Institute for Public Health.  
Investigating COVID-19 Vaccine Outreach Strategies for Marginalized Newcomer Communities

Gerald Giesbrecht
University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine, Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute, Owerko Centre.
Short-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on infant socioemotional and neurodevelopment

  • Building upon a cohort of 10,000 pregnant Canadians recruited during the pandemic, the team’s objective is to determine whether prenatal maternal stress and SARS-CoV-2 infection associate with neuro- and/or socioemotional developmental delay in infants at one year. The study involves individuals who were pregnant during the pandemic and who enrolled in the Pregnancy During the COVID-19 Pandemic Study. The team is working with individuals to obtain measures of the potential impacts of the pandemic on child development.

Amir Sanati Nezhad, Reed Ferber, Line Duffett-Leger
University of Calgary, Schulich School of Engineering
REMOTE Study: Longitudinal Monitoring of the Incidence of SARS-CoV-2 Infection and Immunity Levels in Long-Term Care Facilities

  • University of Calgary researchers will collaborate with the York University researchers, Brenda Strafford Foundation (BSF), W21C Research and Innovation Centre, Alberta Precision Laboratories, and VitalTracer wearable company to implement and evaluate a new self-testing approach of monitoring both infection and immunity levels through a unique vital signs (measured by smartwatches) and immunity level monitoring system (point-of-care biosensors) integrated with a machine-learning harnessed web-app (REMOTE). The project will benefit to protecting at-risk LTC residents in Alberta while helping them remain socially and emotionally connected. It will represent an opportunity to provide evidence-informed recommendations for the development of standards for staffing and infection monitoring, prevention, and control in LTC homes. The outcomes of this research in the short term will provide enhanced uptake of accurate rapid tests and digital technologies by LTC staff and residents, and in the longer term, will build the basic infrastructure for a shift in home-based medicine and remote monitoring of diseases.
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The top 5 content management trends in 2022

In 2022, CMS buyers should consider headless technology and automation, among other trends in content management.

As organizations create content for a growing set of digital channels, they can benefit from headless technology’s omnichannel delivery. Also, interest in AI, automation and personalization continues, said Cheryl McKinnon, principal analyst at Forrester Research. Beyond technology, trends like tool integration can help organizations customize their content management systems (CMSes). Continued digital transformation offers the flexibility needed to thrive in a remote work environment.

Key content management trends to track in 2022 are the following:

  1. Headless technology
  2. Automation
  3. Personalization
  4. Tool integration
  5. Digital transformation

Although omnichannel demands and pandemic-related restrictions restructured the content management landscape, the following tools and strategies can help organizations succeed in uncertain times.

1. Headless technology

Organizations need flexibility in CMSes, as these systems transport content to many digital platforms, such as websites, mobile applications and digital displays. A headless CMS can improve flexibility, as it enables back-end — the body — content creation and storage without a fixed front-end — the head. Headless systems use RESTful APIs to transport content, eliminating the need for multiple CMSes.

Cheryl McKinnon

Although people often associate headless technology with web content management systems, enterprise content management (ECM) systems have their own spin on this trend. ECM systems can evolve into content services, McKinnon said. Content services are like ECM systems with more flexibility, as they use APIs to integrate different apps for seamless UX, like headless CMSes.

Headless technology and content services both offer organizations flexibility, as each service uses APIs to create various digital experiences.

2. Automation

A chart that lists five trends in content management
Learn about the five top trends in content management.

AI and automation can save employees’ time and automate emails, offer speech-to-text translations, extract data and more. In 2022, McKinnon said she expects to see more AI adoption as ECM vendors partner with cloud providers to offer prepackaged algorithms that business professionals and developers can deploy with little AI expertise.

“Vendors [will be] doing more packaging and pretraining of the algorithms. … Instead of saying, ‘Hey, Mr. Customer, here’s 1,000 different choices you have,’ … vendors are starting to realize it’s easier if they provide some prepackaged algorithms tuned to specific use cases,” McKinnon said.

Organizations may struggle to build their own AI algorithms or choose which services to prioritize. So, many CMS vendors have partnered with cloud providers to offer prepackaged algorithms, or bundles of different AI services like contact center analytics, document processing and image classification.

These bundles combine AI services relevant for multiple industries, so organizations can get several services they need and easily implement them as one service bundle. This process simplifies AI implementation and gives more organizations AI and automation capabilities.

3. Personalization

Personalization can optimize UX for an organization’s customers and employees. Whether a customer shops online or a journalist searches for an expert to interview, CMS personalization can help users accomplish goals and boost an organization’s productivity.

In particular, interest in personalizing knowledge management with techniques like smart recommendations has grown, McKinnon said.

Smart recommendations — AI-powered algorithms that help employees locate information, tools and contacts — can save users time. For example, an app’s smart recommendations can present a user with relevant documents and contacts based on their past activity.

In 2022, CMS buyers can expect personalization innovations in knowledge management to increase efficiency for users.

4. Tool integration

As employees increasingly rely on technology, a constant need to launch, and switch between, separate tools can thwart efficiency. To ensure employees can work seamlessly on various apps, an organization can choose a system that embeds all its tools into one interface.

“From an ECM point of view, the whole concept of … a modern flexible platform is really so organizations can embed the best-of-breed,” McKinnon said.

In the coming years, more developers may embrace an API-first approach, which lets organizations integrate tools from different vendors to improve UX. Developers can create APIs for an organization’s existing systems or build new systems around APIs.

For example, an organization that wants digital process automation and reporting analytics tools in its CMS — which ECM vendors typically lack, McKinnon said — may purchase these tools from specialized vendors. An API-fist approach enables the organization to integrate its specialized tools into one interface in its CMS.

5. Digital transformation

In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic forced organizations to accelerate digital transformation, and this acceleration will likely continue. At the start of the pandemic, many business leaders quickly adopted what they thought were short-term remote work strategies, which gradually became long-term.

“Many organizations have clearly said there’s going to be a larger number of full-time home office workers, even after all the pandemic’s worst is past us,” McKinnon said.

Permanent remote work means organizations must add to or improve the digital foundations they laid in 2020 — especially tools or tactics they used as temporary fixes. In particular, organizations may look to further digitize paper-based processes, such as switching to e-signatures, McKinnon said.

Organizations face pressures to make their content strategies flexible enough to deal with omnichannel demands and COVID-19 restrictions, and to increase productivity. Headless technology, AI, personalization, tool integration and digital transformation respond to such pressures, and CMS buyers should consider how these tools and strategies can help their organizations succeed.

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Law firms cut ties with Russian clients as sanctions bite

* International firms are reassessing client relationships
to
comply with sanctions over the Ukraine invasion

* White & Case said it is “taking steps to exit some
representations”

WASHINGTON, March 1 (Reuters) – Major international law
firms with Russia offices, including White & Case, Baker
McKenzie and Morgan, Lewis & Bockius, are scrambling to respond
this week as an intensifying sanctions web puts some clients off
limits and threatens their business in Moscow.

White & Case, a New York-founded firm with more than 2,200
attorneys and that worked with sanctioned VTB Bank last year on
a $1.7 billion restructuring deal, is assessing its work in
Russia and Belarus “and taking steps to exit some
representations in accordance with applicable rules of
professional responsibility,” a firm spokesperson said Monday.

A spokesperson for Baker McKenzie, which has advised VTB on
financing matters and has roughly 4,700 lawyers, said Monday
that the firm is “reviewing and adjusting our Russia-related
operations and client work” to comply with sanctions. “This will
mean in some cases exiting relationships completely,” the
spokesperson said.

Baker McKenzie’s website says it has more than 130 lawyers
based in Russia.
A spokesperson for Philadelphia-founded Morgan Lewis said the
firm will ensure it remains in compliance with sanctions,
“including with respect to any client representations.”

Morgan Lewis earlier this month touted its work for VTB Bank
and the Russian state development corporation VEB.RF in a $2.3
billion financing project for a mining site. The 2,000-lawyer
firm removed a press release on the deal from its website
Monday.

At least two other U.S. law firms, Sidley Austin and
Venable, already last week terminated registrations to lobby in
Washington for sanctioned financial institutions VTB and
Sberbank, respectively.

The West has moved to punish Russia with a raft of measures,
including shutting out some Russian banks from the SWIFT global
financial network and restricting Moscow’s ability to use its
$630 billion foreign reserves.

The economic fallout has continued to escalate. Shell said https://www.reuters.com/business/energy/shell-exit-russia-operations-after-ukraine-invasion-2022-02-28
Monday that it will exit all Russian operations, one day after
BP said it will pull out its stake in the Russian oil giant
Rosneft over the Ukrainian invasion.

At least 20 international law firms have offices in Moscow,
hosting lawyers who often work with colleagues in London and New
York to advise clients in energy, finance and other sectors.

It’s unclear how much business law firms will lose from
severing ties with prohibited clients, and many will likely find
business advising other clients on navigating the sanctions. Not
all of the new sanctions have immediately gone into effect,
giving firms time to end relationships.

Many global law firms that have Moscow offices have worked
with newly sanctioned Russian entities in the past, according to
press releases and media accounts, including Akin Gump Strauss
Hauer & Feld; Allen & Overy; Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton;
Debevoise & Plimpton; Dentons; Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer;
Hogan Lovells; Latham & Watkins; and Skadden, Arps, Slate,
Meagher & Flom. Representatives for those firms declined to
comment or did not respond to questions about their Russia work
and operations.

Representatives for London-founded global firm Linklaters,
transatlantic firm Bryan Cave Leighton Paisner and Texas-founded
Baker Botts, which also have offices in Moscow and have worked
for newly sanctioned entities, said they were reviewing their
client matters.

A lawyer in the Moscow office of one global law firm said
the scope of current sanctions would cut more deeply into
international lawyers’ business in Russia than past sanctions
rounds, as the new penalties from individual countries overlap
more broadly.

“London firms won’t be able to just step in where U.S. firms
had to back out,” said the lawyer, who requested anonymity to
speak about a sensitive topic. “It’ll be more complicated this
time.”

(Reporting by Jacqueline Thomsen.
Editing by David Bario and Gail Cohen.)

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The top 5 content management trends in 2022

In 2022, CMS buyers should consider headless technology and automation, among other trends in content management.

As organizations create content for a growing set of digital channels, they can benefit from headless technology’s omnichannel delivery. Also, interest in AI, automation and personalization continues, said Cheryl McKinnon, principal analyst at Forrester Research. Beyond technology, trends like tool integration can help organizations customize their content management systems (CMSes). Continued digital transformation offers the flexibility needed to thrive in a remote work environment.

Key content management trends to track in 2022 are the following:

  1. Headless technology
  2. Automation
  3. Personalization
  4. Tool integration
  5. Digital transformation

Although omnichannel demands and pandemic-related restrictions restructured the content management landscape, the following tools and strategies can help organizations succeed in uncertain times.

1. Headless technology

Organizations need flexibility in CMSes, as these systems transport content to many digital platforms, such as websites, mobile applications and digital displays. A headless CMS can improve flexibility, as it enables back-end — the body — content creation and storage without a fixed front-end — the head. Headless systems use RESTful APIs to transport content, eliminating the need for multiple CMSes.

Cheryl McKinnon

Although people often associate headless technology with web content management systems, enterprise content management (ECM) systems have their own spin on this trend. ECM systems can evolve into content services, McKinnon said. Content services are like ECM systems with more flexibility, as they use APIs to integrate different apps for seamless UX, like headless CMSes.

Headless technology and content services both offer organizations flexibility, as each service uses APIs to create various digital experiences.

2. Automation

A chart that lists five trends in content management
Learn about the five top trends in content management.

AI and automation can save employees’ time and automate emails, offer speech-to-text translations, extract data and more. In 2022, McKinnon said she expects to see more AI adoption as ECM vendors partner with cloud providers to offer prepackaged algorithms that business professionals and developers can deploy with little AI expertise.

“Vendors [will be] doing more packaging and pretraining of the algorithms. … Instead of saying, ‘Hey, Mr. Customer, here’s 1,000 different choices you have,’ … vendors are starting to realize it’s easier if they provide some prepackaged algorithms tuned to specific use cases,” McKinnon said.

Organizations may struggle to build their own AI algorithms or choose which services to prioritize. So, many CMS vendors have partnered with cloud providers to offer prepackaged algorithms, or bundles of different AI services like contact center analytics, document processing and image classification.

These bundles combine AI services relevant for multiple industries, so organizations can get several services they need and easily implement them as one service bundle. This process simplifies AI implementation and gives more organizations AI and automation capabilities.

3. Personalization

Personalization can optimize UX for an organization’s customers and employees. Whether a customer shops online or a journalist searches for an expert to interview, CMS personalization can help users accomplish goals and boost an organization’s productivity.

In particular, interest in personalizing knowledge management with techniques like smart recommendations has grown, McKinnon said.

Smart recommendations — AI-powered algorithms that help employees locate information, tools and contacts — can save users time. For example, an app’s smart recommendations can present a user with relevant documents and contacts based on their past activity.

In 2022, CMS buyers can expect personalization innovations in knowledge management to increase efficiency for users.

4. Tool integration

As employees increasingly rely on technology, a constant need to launch, and switch between, separate tools can thwart efficiency. To ensure employees can work seamlessly on various apps, an organization can choose a system that embeds all its tools into one interface.

“From an ECM point of view, the whole concept of … a modern flexible platform is really so organizations can embed the best-of-breed,” McKinnon said.

In the coming years, more developers may embrace an API-first approach, which lets organizations integrate tools from different vendors to improve UX. Developers can create APIs for an organization’s existing systems or build new systems around APIs.

For example, an organization that wants digital process automation and reporting analytics tools in its CMS — which ECM vendors typically lack, McKinnon said — may purchase these tools from specialized vendors. An API-fist approach enables the organization to integrate its specialized tools into one interface in its CMS.

5. Digital transformation

In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic forced organizations to accelerate digital transformation, and this acceleration will likely continue. At the start of the pandemic, many business leaders quickly adopted what they thought were short-term remote work strategies, which gradually became long-term.

“Many organizations have clearly said there’s going to be a larger number of full-time home office workers, even after all the pandemic’s worst is past us,” McKinnon said.

Permanent remote work means organizations must add to or improve the digital foundations they laid in 2020 — especially tools or tactics they used as temporary fixes. In particular, organizations may look to further digitize paper-based processes, such as switching to e-signatures, McKinnon said.

Organizations face pressures to make their content strategies flexible enough to deal with omnichannel demands and COVID-19 restrictions, and to increase productivity. Headless technology, AI, personalization, tool integration and digital transformation respond to such pressures, and CMS buyers should consider how these tools and strategies can help their organizations succeed.

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Best email hosting 2022: You need a professional address

So, you think chat apps, mobile messaging, texting, and Facebook will kill email? Think again. The number of email users worldwide has been steadily growing year by year. In 2017,  there were 269 billion emails sent each day. By 2019, that had grown to almost 294 billion. And by 2023, Statistica estimates, we’ll be sending more than 347 billion messages a day.

Clearly, email is still a force for communication. Suppose, if you want to go beyond the free email offerings, present a professional email address, and have some level of control over your corporate email communications. In that case, you’ll want to sign up with an email hosting provider.

In this article, we present you with a number of excellent email hosting providers who specialize in email and office productivity. Then, we’ll introduce you to some web hosts that also offer solid email hosting packages, in case you want to contract for web hosting and email from the same vendor.

Traditional email-focused hosting providers

Here are some of the top email-focused hosting providers. It’s probably no surprise we kick off with Google’s Workspace (formerly G Suite) and Microsoft’s Microsoft 365 and Exchange. But they’re not the only games in town. Keep reading to see some alternative options if you don’t want to live entirely in Microsoft’s or Google’s ecosystem.

Enterprise-level Gmail


  • Your domain name: Yes.
  • Mailbox size: 30GB, 2TB, and 5TB.
  • Spam and virus protection: Yes.
  • Aliases: Yes.
  • 24/7 support: Chat, ticket, or phone.
  • Archiving and storage: Depending on the plan.

It was really a coin toss whether we kicked this email provider list off with Workspace or Microsoft 365. Both are excellent. Workspace integrates an enterprise-level Gmail management interface with Google Docs, Meet, Calendar, and a wide variety of other tools.

Must read:

Pricing is a lot simpler to understand with Workspace than Office 365. Microsoft offers a wide variety of plans and options that also integrate into its other licensing pricing structures. Gmail gives you just three simple choices: $6 per month, $12 per month, or $18 per month per user, depending on what enterprise management features you want.

Unfortunately, when G Suite transitioned to Workspace, the non-enterprise plans lost their unlimited storage. While G Suite was compelling on its own, the unlimited storage made it a must-have. Removal of that capability has reduced Workspace’s appeal, but it still does a great job of mail management.

More details:

Here’s a special tip: If you want to get support from Google, get a Workspace subscription. As a Workspace customer, I’ve been quite pleased with the level of support provided.

All of Office, plus email


microsoft-365.jpg

  • Your domain name: Yes.
  • Mailbox size: 50GB and up.
  • Spam and virus protection: Yes.
  • Aliases: Yes.
  • 24/7 support: Chat, ticket, or phone.
  • Archiving and storage: Depending on the plan.

Office 365 is becoming Microsoft 365 because… why not? Except, not entirely. Home users will still get Office 365. This is a fabulous product, but I swear Microsoft goes out of its way to confuse folks with its branding changes. It’s like it’s a hobby or something.

That said, Microsoft 365 is all the Office desktop apps, all of the Office online apps, Microsoft Teams, all the benefits of Exchange, calendaring, mobile apps, and more. I also have a Microsoft 365 subscription, mostly for the Office apps. That said, you can not go wrong with Office, er, Microsoft 365. And if you love your Outlook email client, you’ll feel right at home with Microsoft 365.

Let Microsoft run your Exchange server


exchange.jpg

  • Your domain name: Yes.
  • Mailbox size: 50GB and up.
  • Spam and virus protection: Yes.
  • Aliases: Yes.
  • 24/7 support: Chat, ticket, or phone.
  • Archiving and storage: Depending on the plan.

Trust me when I tell you that running Exchange in-house is a big job. Way back in the day, I almost lost everything when my (admittedly misconfigured) Exchange server crashed hard due to a failed hard drive. Even though I thought I had backups, it took me 13 days to get things back up and running.

On the other hand, Exchange has been having severe security troubles of late. That said, if I were running Exchange, I’d much rather have Microsoft responsible for making it safe than having to deal with it all myself.

Must read:

I can’t tell you what I would have given to be freed from that responsibility. That was before Microsoft had Azure and Exchange Online. But now, all you need to do is pay a few bucks a month, and Microsoft will manage your Exchange operations and deliver all your email messages for you. To be fair, I’d recommend adding a few bucks and going to the Office 365 Business Premium plan I showed you earlier, but still, what I would have given for this service back in the day!

Amazon’s AWS service for mail management


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  • Your domain name: Yes.
  • Mailbox size: 50GB.
  • Spam and virus protection: Yes.
  • Aliases: Yes.
  • 24/7 support: Chat, ticket, or phone.
  • Archiving and storage: Added fee.

So, let’s be clear. You’re looking at email hosted on AWS. That’s pretty much the gold standard of cloud environments, on a rarified level that coexists only with Google and Microsoft Azure. Because it’s an AWS-based service, WorkMail integrates with all the other AWS services, allowing you to build out a relatively rich cloud-based, customized infrastructure.

If you’re a small company, just trying to set up a few email boxes, I wouldn’t necessarily go with WorkMail. AWS can be a little challenging to get your head around. But if you’re building out a cloud-based corporate infrastructure where you need a lot of flexibility, security, and Active Directory integration, WorkMail is definitely a viable and proven solution.

Microsoft 365, Exchange, and SMTP email


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  • Your domain name: Yes
  • Mailbox size: Unlimited
  • Spam and virus protection: Yes
  • Aliases: Yes
  • 24/7 support: Chat, ticket, or phone
  • Archiving and storage: Added fee

Rackspace is one of the original cloud infrastructure providers. Today, the company offers a wide range of infrastructure-as-a-service options, including full Exchange hosting, Microsoft 365 management, and traditional email hosting.

The company offers migration assistance from other hosts, a large team of MCSA certified staff, and the ability to support an existing Microsoft Enterprise Agreement. 

Exchange, SMTP, and email servers


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  • Your domain name: Yes.
  • Mailbox size: 10GB or 25GB.
  • Spam and virus protection: Yes.
  • Aliases: Yes.
  • 24/7 support: Chat, ticket, or phone.
  • Archiving and storage: Added fee.

Greatmail offers a cloud-based email hosting service with both a web-based client and traditional POP3/IMAP clients. The company offers basic email plans with just email, as well as a groupware plan that includes mail, calendar, and contact syncing.

If you’re interested in bulk-sending email, the company does offer an SMTP-sending service for “responsible senders.” This service includes an outbound relay service for transactional messages, email marketing campaigns, newsletters, and other applications.

The company also offers dedicated email servers. Greatmail’s Exchange hosting is a traditional offering, but it also has a plan that allows a mix of both POP3 and Exchange clients to reduce Exchange per-user licensing costs.

Lots of integrated applications to work alongside mail


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  • Your domain name: Yes
  • Mailbox size: 5GB or 50GB
  • Spam and virus protection: Yes
  • Aliases: Yes
  • 24/7 support: Email and ticket
  • Archiving and storage: Added fee
  • Zoho is another one of those companies that provides a lot of offerings. However, instead of offering web hosting, Zoho offers a wide range of cloud-based apps. It’s kind of like G Suite on steroids. This is important once you start looking at the idea of integrating email tightly with CRM. Zoho has a very solid CRM tool that I used for many years (and only stopped when I stopped having to manage sales folks and make sales calls).

    While it does offer personal email, it’s its group or organization email that really shines. The email web interface is solid, plus it has some extensive management tools and a neat little Slack-like feature called Streams that lets you chat while outside your email box.

    Full-featured mail server plus cloud offering


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  • Your domain name: Yes.
  • Mailbox size: 5GB, 100GB, and 500GB.
  • Spam and virus protection: Yes.
  • Aliases: Yes.
  • 24/7 support: Chat, ticket, or phone.
  • Archiving and storage: Included.
  • You know, when you’re stuck at home during a worldwide pandemic, you have a lot of time to think. And, I’ve been thinking about the name IceWarp. It easily has to be the best name of all our hosting providers, hands down.

    More to the point, IceWarp is a company that used to sell its own mail server software, an installable application that competed with Exchange. Its since pivoted to become a hosting provider, using software that runs on its IceWarp server. Its cloud offerings now included shared contacts and calendar, collaborative document editing, mailing list management, web meetings, audio and video calls, mobile apps, and archiving — all available from even the most basic plan.

    Exchange with benefits


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    • Your domain name: Yes.
    • Mailbox size: Unlimited.
    • Spam and virus protection: Yes.
    • Aliases: Yes.
    • 24/7 support: Chat, ticket, or phone.
    • Archiving and storage: Depending on the plan.

    Intermedia takes a healthy deep dive into the email needs of enterprises and serious small businesses. The company’s offerings start with either Exchange or Microsoft 365 and then build on that.

    We particularly like the Intermedia Email Protection service that’s offered as part of all its plans. This includes a policy-based approach to spam and malware blocking, anti-phishing protection, point-of-click protection, outbound email protection, and zero-hour protection against emerging threats. 

    All the plans also offer video conferencing. Intermedia has unlimited storage for all of its Exchange plans.

    Web hosting providers offering email hosting

    Almost every web hosting provider offers email of one sort or another. For most, it’s just a door-opening option, but very little attention is paid to optimizing the email infrastructure for customers. By contrast, the following vendors have more dedicated offerings, allowing you to have a single vendor, but also something of a more optimized infrastructure.

    Everything you ever needed for hosting, including email and upsells


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    • Your domain name: Yes. And I’d sure like to register it for you!
    • Mailbox size: 5GB and 50GB.
    • Spam and virus protection: Added fee.
    • Aliases: Yes.
    • 24/7 support: Chat, ticket, or phone.
    • Archiving and storage: Added fee.

    GoDaddy offers… everything. The company is one of the most prolific software-as-a-service providers, focusing mostly on anything that can be hosted, but with a wide range of ancillary services. The company offers traditional webmail (which also comes with many of its hosting plans) as well as a variety of individual and enterprise Microsoft 365 plans.

    I’ve been a GoDaddy customer for well over a decade, mostly using them as a domain registrar. My experience has generally been positive. Although its more experienced tech support staff aren’t available all the time, I’ve never failed to get any issues resolved when reaching out to them for tech support. Here are two articles I wrote quite some time ago that give a more in-depth view of its support service:

    Must read:

    Just be careful. While tech support is free, GoDaddy likes charging added fees for all sorts of ancillary services.

    Email with calendar and integrated video


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    • Your domain name: Yes.
    • Mailbox size: 10GB or 30GB.
    • Spam and virus protection: Virus.
    • Aliases: Yes.
    • 24/7 support: Chat, ticket, or phone (surcharge for priority support).
    • Archiving and storage: No.

    We reviewed Hostinger quite positively when looking at website hosting providers. It should be noted that the company’s shared web hosting plan does include email accounts and mailboxes.

    Also: Hostinger web hosting review: Good support and a killer entry-level price

    That said, the dedicated hosting service provided by Hostinger goes a step further, using the Flockmail web client that provides integrated calendaring and video call invites (where you can host meetings for up to 50 people).

    Web hosting with email hosting thrown in


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    • Your domain name: Yes.
    • Mailbox size: Unlimited*.
    • Spam and virus protection: Yes.
    • Aliases: Yes.
    • 24/7 support: Ticket-based.
    • Archiving and storage: free on some plans.

    *Keep in mind that “unlimited” never really means unlimited, terms of service apply.

    A2 Hosting doesn’t provide separate email hosting services. Like many of the web hosts we’ve profiled, A2 offers POP3/IMAP and SMTP hosting as part of its regular web hosting plans.

    Because A2’s email hosting lives on top of its traditional hosting offerings, a wide range of email software services are just an install click away. Why did we choose email from A2 from the many web hosts we’ve looked at? We like that it offers mail list management at no additional charge.

    Email-only plan for those who want their own @domain email address


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    • Your domain name: Yes.
    • Mailbox size: 25GB*.
    • Spam and virus protection: Yes.
    • Aliases: Yes.
    • 24/7 support: Chat widget.
    • Archiving and storage: No.

    *Oddly, while the company advertises “Huge 25GB Storage per Mailbox” right at the top of their page, it shows this on the FAQ: “25GB is the current limit. However, you should keep it under 1GB to avoid issues with your folders loading.”

    DreamHost is an easy and relatively powerful solution for email management. I’ve used its web hosting services and found the technical support to be solid. For about $20 a year per mailbox, DreamHost is a viable option to quickly get a professional email address. 

    I’d say that the biggest benefit to DreamHost is the solid anti-spam/anti-phishing/anti-malware offering that lives on top of a good webmail client and support for Outlook and all your mobile desktop devices over IMAP.

    Standard email, Exchange, and Office 365


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    • Your domain name: Yes
    • Mailbox size: 2GB, 50GB, and 100GB
    • Spam and virus protection: Yes
    • Aliases: Yes
    • 24/7 support: Chat, ticket, or phone
    • Archiving and storage: No

    Fasthosts is another web hosting provider offering email hosting as a separate buy-in. It offers a very basic plan for two email addresses and two very tiny 2MB mailboxes for about $16 a year. If you want a plan with an SMTP server for cheap, this is a way to go.

    But the real appeal to Fasthosts is the Exchange 2019 and Microsoft 365 offerings. Their Exchange plans offer some of the largest mailbox sizes we’ve seen (up to 100GB). What we particularly like is the availability of both web hosting and professional email hosting from the same vendor.

    Microsoft 365 as an upgrade to web hosting


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    • Your domain name: Yes.
    • Mailbox size: 15GB or 50GB.
    • Spam and virus protection: Yes.
    • Aliases: Yes.
    • 24/7 support: Chat, ticket, or phone (at reduced hours due to COVID-19).
    • Archiving and storage: Added fee.

    BlueHost has taken an interesting approach to offering email hosting, and we’re spotlighting them mostly for the fact that its email business model differs from most web hosting providers.

    Rather than adding email services to its normal cPanel web hosting control, Bluehost pushes customers toward adding Office 365. In fact, it will only sell you email hosting if you already have a web hosting account with it and this is probably because, for the first year, it resells Microsoft 365 at break-even or possibly even a loss. Pricing on that first year is quite inexpensive, starting at $2.99 per month, but it goes up in subsequent years. 

    Full-featured email hosting with migration assistance


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    • Your domain name: Yes.
    • Mailbox size: 5GB, 30GB, and 75GB.
    • Spam and virus protection: Yes.
    • Aliases: Yes.
    • 24/7 support: Chat and ticket-based.
    • Archiving and storage: No.

    Namecheap gets its name because it started off life as a domain registrar, but has grown into a full-fledged hosting provider. I’ve purchased SSL certificates from them and found the support to be responsive and the pricing reasonable.

    We like that Namecheap starts with a 60-day money-back guarantee, so you have more than enough time to set up and test. It has a great mini-enterprise unified management capability, allowing you to manage multiple email accounts from one interface. We’re also quite glad to see that the company offers a variety of email migration support options. It also upped its mailbox size for the top two plans from last year.

    Features a home-ground account isolation mechanism


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    • Your domain name: Yes.
    • Mailbox size: 10GB.
    • Spam and virus protection: Yes.
    • Aliases: Yes.
    • 24/7 support: Phone, chat, tickets.
    • Archiving and storage: Free backups.

    SiteGround is another provider that is primarily known for web hosting and doesn’t sell email hosting as a separate package. That said, once you sign up for their hosting service, you can use your own domain and the company provides an unlimited (within reason) number of email accounts, aliases, and forwarders.

    There are a few specific things we like about SiteGround that, while not directly email-related, may help you make your decision. One factor that might help you decide is that SiteGround has a home-ground account isolation mechanism, which means that other users of shared resources can’t impact your performance. The company primarily runs its servers on the Google Cloud, which means they’re also participating in Google’s renewable energy efforts and clean energy data centers

    One note about SiteGround. It’s entry-level prices are compelling, especially for email hosting. But be aware that while you might pay $44.28 for the first year (effectively $3.69/month), when it comes time to renew, you’ll be asked to pay $179.88 for your second year (or about $14.99/month). SiteGround’s first-period discounts are steep, but they don’t extend those discounts when you want to renew. There is a 30 day money-back guarantee, so before to test before you commit.

    Email hosting with free account migration


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    • Your domain name: Yes.
    • Mailbox size: 50GB, 100GB, and 150GB.
    • Spam and virus protection: Yes.
    • Aliases: Yes.
    • 24/7 support: Chat and ticket-based.
    • Archiving and storage: No.

    Scala Hosting has been around since 2007 and provides web hosting as its primary business. In fact, the creator of the popular content management system Joomla! is spotlighted, endorsing Scala’s hosting services. That’s a clear mark in the company’s favor.

    But the one thing that stood out most to us when looking at Scala’s email hosting services was their free account migration. Migrating email accounts (especially all the old emails) can be a time-consuming and error-prone process. Having the ability to offload that to Scala — and to do it for free — is a big win. For that alone, we recommend giving them a try. One note: they only have a 30-day money-back guarantee, so if you have them migrate your email, be sure to find out how long it will take and when the money-back calendar triggers, so you know how much time you have to test.

    How did we choose these email hosting providers?

    I did some calculating back in the mid-2010s and realized I’d sent out something in the order of 740 million email messages. I’ve built, coded, managed, sweated, and swore at email and list servers for a few decades now. From all that experience comes one unyielding truth: It’s far, far better to have another company manage your email.

    I’ve personally done business and been a customer of about half the vendors on this list. I’ve run my email on Exchange servers, through Office 365 (now Microsoft 365) and G Suite (now Workspace). I’ve migrated email accounts across the internet and vendors. I’ve increased my profanity vocabulary by an order of magnitude.

    Also: How to build a website for any business: Your step-by-step guide 

    My point is: I’ve been down this rabbit hole in just about every way imaginable. In making recommendations, I started with the vendors I’m personally familiar with and feel comfortable recommending. That pretty much filled the list of traditional email hosting providers. Then, I picked from the many web hosts I’ve looked at over the years, keeping a careful eye on the sorts of email offerings they provided. From the thousands of web hosting providers out there, I picked a few that have more in-depth offerings or provide a better customer experience.

    Which email hosting provider is best for you?

    Let me make this simple for you: If you want a no-brainer decision, just choose Google Workspace or Microsoft 365, depending on whether you’re more tied to the Google or Microsoft ecosystem. That’s it. Both are excellent offerings, that provide solid, if sometimes, frustrating support, and will get you where you need to go. Full stop.

    All the other providers are for more edge-case needs. Do you want one hosting provider for both web and email? Then choose one of the web hosts. Do you want to pay about $12 a year for email? Consider Fasthosts. Do you want to integrate domain registration and email? Then consider GoDaddy and Namecheap. Do you want Microsoft 365 but want support from another company that adds value to those offerings? Consider Intermedia. Do you want a deep, homegrown email offering that has nothing to do with Microsoft or Google? Consider IceWarp.

    See? This is what I’m talking about. if you want special case situations, there’s probably a hosting provider here that can help. But if you just want basic, solid email hosting and maybe collaboration and office productivity apps, it’s Google or Microsoft. 

    What about you? What email hosting provider do you use? How has your experience been? Let us know in the comments below.

    Must read: 

    Frequently asked questions

    Since this article was originally published, we’ve recieved a bunch of email hosting and general email questions. Three of the most common are answered briefly below.

    How to properly recover a stolen email account with a Google server?

    This doesn’t just apply if you’re using Google for your email. If you’re using another hosting provider, but also using Gmail, you might need to get this answered. It’s obviously easiest if you can still login. But even if you can’t, Google offers a set of steps for you to follow. Here’s Google’s page to get you started. But keep in mind that the best way to avoid having to recover a stolen email account is to properly protect it. Be sure to set up multi-factor authentication and get your recovery codes from Google.

    What free email service end in org?

    There are free email services, but be careful: free services often come with other costs, including your privacy. Since it’s costly to maintain an email hosting service, those using free services may not get much support or may find the service just disappears one day. Also be careful of free services that are essentially phishing sites, capturing all the email you get, including personal identifying information. That said, mail.com is a fairly safe service that offers email addresses with the linuxmail.org and musician.org domains. Other free services, like Yahoo and Google, allow you to set up email aliases, so if you have another mailer that supports .org, you can get that email at your Yahoo or Gmail account.


    You can follow my day-to-day project updates on social media. Be sure to follow me on Twitter at @DavidGewirtz, on Facebook at Facebook.com/DavidGewirtz, on Instagram at Instagram.com/DavidGewirtz, and on YouTube at YouTube.com/DavidGewirtzTV.

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    Greylock’s Glen Evans shares strategies for hiring top talent in a hyper-competitive market at TechCrunch Early Stage

    Before anyone ever heard of COVID-19, recruiting and hiring the best people to help build a successful startup was challenging enough. Now consider the pandemic and the seismic shift it caused in the U.S. job market. As a result, millions of people quit working — in a phenomenon known as The Great Resignation — effectively shrinking the available talent pool.

    Combine these factors with 2021, a record year for both startups and VC investments, and it adds up to a major talent shortage and a hyper-competitive job market. That holds true for early-stage startups all the way up to global conglomerates. In 2022, great talent is hard to find.

    How can early-stage founders hope to attract, recruit and hire people with the requisite talent and expertise? It’s a vital question, and it’s the reason we invited Glen Evans, partner of Core Talent at Greylock, to tackle this topic at TechCrunch Early Stage on April 14.

    In an interactive workshop called How to Hire Top Talent in Today’s Hyper-Competitive Market, Evans will help early-stage founders learn how to optimize the recruiting and hiring process, how to find and develop talent, and he’ll share best practices for closing candidates.

    An eminently qualified recruiting professional, Evans leads the core talent team at Greylock, where he helps entrepreneurs prioritize recruiting as a core business strategy for building high-quality teams. His team supports recruiting and talent acquisition strategies for its portfolio companies, which include Airbnb, Dropbox and Facebook to name a few. He also helps entrepreneurs find tools and systems to streamline their recruiting, interviewing and hiring processes.

    Prior to joining Greylock in 2018, Evans spent more than 12 years managing the recruiting and team-building efforts at multiple tech companies, such as Facebook, Google and Slack.

    During his tenure at Slack, Evans served as the tech company’s first recruitment director during a period of rapid growth. He designed talent acquisition strategies and helped the company hire across all functions on a global scale.

    He played an instrumental role in the early days of Facebook by building its engineering teams and processes as the company began scaling rapidly. While there he also built the recruiting team to support aggressive growth plans, and he facilitated the post-acquisition onboarding of Oculus into Facebook’s operations.

    Recruiting and hiring talented people for your startup is more challenging than ever. Join Glen Evans and hear how to design and optimize hiring and recruitment strategies, find highly qualified candidates and learn the latest thinking on hiring and developing top talent in 2022.

    TC Early Stage sessions provide plenty of time to engage, ask questions and walk away with a deeper working understanding of topics and skills that are essential to startup success. Secure your seat for this session and tons of other essential founder workshops before prices increase!

    https://tcprotectedembed.com/protected-iframe/b6f445c529505450998e267e5bda5397 ( function() { var func = function() { var iframe = document.getElementById(‘wpcom-iframe-b6f445c529505450998e267e5bda5397’) if ( iframe ) { iframe.onload = function() { iframe.contentWindow.postMessage( { ‘msg_type’: ‘poll_size’, ‘frame_id’: ‘wpcom-iframe-b6f445c529505450998e267e5bda5397’ }, “https://tcprotectedembed.com” ); } } // Autosize iframe var funcSizeResponse = function( e ) { var origin = document.createElement( ‘a’ ); origin.href = e.origin; // Verify message origin if ( ‘tcprotectedembed.com’ !== origin.host ) return; // Verify message is in a format we expect if ( ‘object’ !== typeof e.data || undefined === e.data.msg_type ) return; switch ( e.data.msg_type ) { case ‘poll_size:response’: var iframe = document.getElementById( e.data._request.frame_id ); if ( iframe && ” === iframe.width ) iframe.width = ‘100%’; if ( iframe && ” === iframe.height ) iframe.height = parseInt( e.data.height ); return; default: return; } } if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.addEventListener ) { window.addEventListener( ‘message’, funcSizeResponse, false ); } else if ( ‘function’ === typeof window.attachEvent ) { window.attachEvent( ‘onmessage’, funcSizeResponse ); } } if (document.readyState === ‘complete’) { func.apply(); /* compat for infinite scroll */ } else if ( document.addEventListener ) { document.addEventListener( ‘DOMContentLoaded’, func, false ); } else if ( document.attachEvent ) { document.attachEvent( ‘onreadystatechange’, func ); } } )();

    cameyo-chrome-enterprise.jpg

    Cameyo joins Chrome Enterprise Recommended Program

    Virtual App Delivery has become a very hot topic over the past couple of years as thousands have shifted to a remote or hybrid workflow. For many businesses, the shift to Chrome OS and the Chrome Enterprise Platform means finding a way to embrace Google’s cloud-centric services while still being able to access legacy Windows applications from anywhere. That’s where app virtualization comes into play. Companies like VMware and Citrix make this possible by delivering a virtualized Windows desktop that can be accessed from any browser and that gives enterprise clients a lot of flexibility for their respective hybrid workers.

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    Cameyo, on the other hand, takes a different path to the virtualization solution by giving users direct access to virtualized Windows applications without the need for full-blown, resource-heavy Windows Desktops. Instead, users can quickly access admin-installed applications on the web via the Cameyo dashboard. This makes the delivery and execution of the applications more streamlined and user-friendly.

    To make the platform even more flexible, Cameyo offers a variety of application hosting options from fully hosted by Cameyo to self-hosting via your company’s infrastructure or you can host via your business’s cloud service like Google Cloud, Azure, or AWS. This creates a very powerful stop-gap for enterprises looking to shift to the cloud without tearing off the proverbial bandaid that is the removal of legacy applications.

    Microsoft Windows is just an app. Hybrid and remote work have highlighted the complexity of legacy desktop delivery and revealed the value of alternative device, application, data and security strategies.

    Mark Bowker, Senior Analyst at Enterprise Strategy Group

    Today’s news brings Cameyo into Google’s Chrome Enterprise Platform with the announcement that the virtual app delivery service is now a recommended partner for Chrome Enterprise clients. Cameyo does much more than just delivering applications to cloud-connected clients. Since the company’s birth, security has been at the heart of every product Cameyo produces. This is reflected in the delivery of Cameyo’s services. Below, you can see the various methods used by the Cameyo platform to ensure a secure, sandboxed user experience with each and every virtualization session.

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    • Cameyo automatically ensures all HTTP, HTTPS, and RDP server ports are closed with its PortShield technology
    • Cameyo does not require on-prem customers to open their firewall to inbound Internet traffic, thanks to its Secure Cloud Tunneling technology 
    • Cameyo eliminates the need for VPNs with its NoVPN technology

    Cameyo CMO Robb Henshaw explained to me that the PortShield technology ensures that the only ports open during sessions are the ones actively being used. The technology continually scans for open ports to prevent unauthorized access to the virtualized applications or devices being used. Cameyo also touts that the NoVPN technology completely removes the need for a VPN when accessing the platform’s services.

    The icing on the cake comes in the form of Cameyo’s pricing. When compared to full-fledged remote desktop solutions, clients have reported as much as 85% savings when making the switch to Cameyo.

    Just looking at the month-to-month cost compared to our previous remote desktop solution, with Cameyo and Chrome OS we are paying only 15% of what we used to pay. But then on top of that 85% savings, we also no longer need windows clients, so we save even more money there. 

    Adam Nerell, Head of IT for Klarahill

    This news makes Cameyo one of only three recommended virtualization partners for Chrome Enterprise and the only one that offers per-application delivery without the need for a Windows Desktop. To find out if Cameyo could work for your company, you can request a free trial here. I’ve tried this out and I can say that setup is quick and easy. I was able to set up my dashboard, install some applications and start using them in under ten minutes. That’s quite impressive.

    About Cameyo

    Cameyo is the secure Virtual Application Delivery (VAD) platform for any Digital Workspace. Cameyo provides a secure, simple, flexible, and cost-effective cloud desktop solution for delivering all your apps – legacy Windows, internal web, and SaaS – to any device from the browser without the need for legacy Virtual Desktops or VPNs. By enabling organizations to provide their people with secure access to the business-critical apps they need to stay productive from anywhere, Cameyo helps make remote & hybrid work, work.

    Cameyo is a Chrome Enterprise Recommended solution, and hundreds of enterprises and organizations across all industries utilize Cameyo to deliver business-critical applications to hundreds of thousands of users worldwide. As of February 2021, Cameyo has a Net Promoter Score (NPS) of +83 with zero detractors – 100% of responding customers would recommend Cameyo to their peers. To learn more, visit cameyo.com.

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    What Ever Happened to GeoCities?

    In the mid 1990s, the internet had no Facebook, Google or even Wikipedia. If you wanted to use the web to promote your business, share important local information with the rest of the world, or even tell your friends about your recent adventures, you’d need to create your own website.

    Most people could learn the basics of HTML coding within a few hours, and starting around 1994, others could use WYSIWYG (what-you-see-is-what-you-get) apps like Adobe PageMill. At one point, even web browsers came bundled with basic website creation tools.

    But then the problem was hosting your site online. Servers cost money (especially back then) and not everyone wanted to pay for that service, or could pay for it, if they were teenagers or college students. Enter GeoCities, which started offering a free hosting plan in 1995.

    GeoCities was more than just a hosting service, however: with community-oriented features and tools to make the creation of websites easier, it could be seen as the forefather of social media. In 1999, the site was the third-most popular on the web.

    At the peak of its popularity, GeoCities was sold to Yahoo!, which drove it away from its social origins, making it irrelevant in the Web 2.0 era. A decade later, it was shut down everywhere outside of Japan. This is the story of an internet that was very different from that of today.

    Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

    GeoCities was started in late 1994 by David Bohnett and Dick Altman as just another web-hosting service called Beverly Hills Internet. In June of the following year it started offering a free plan with a generous 2MB of storage space to users, but that was only the beginning.

    Users, which were called “homesteaders,” were asked to choose a “neighborhood” such as Capitol Hill (“government, politics and lots of strong opinions”), Hollywood (“film and TV”) or Paris (“romance, poetry, the arts”) upon registration. Neighborhoods, as well as “suburbs” to existing neighborhoods, were added as the site kept growing.

    Every neighborhood had its own forum, live chat, and even list of all of the homesteaders that celebrated their birthday each day. The default URL of each site included the name of the neighborhood, and a number, referred to as a “street address.”

    Homesteaders could either use the site’s Basic Home Page Editor to create their site automatically, or upload HTML files, GIF or JPEG images and more. By December 1995, the site had more than 20,000 homesteaders and more than 6 million pageviews per month, when it changed its name to GeoCities.

    The success of GeoCities encouraged the appearance of copycat services and website builders. One of those sites called FortuneCity was TechSpot’s first home in 1998.

    All ‘Bout the Money

    In 1997, GeoCities started showing pop-up advertisements on its free sites. While annoying to visitors, at least they didn’t interfere with the existing designs of websites. The same couldn’t be said about the transparent watermark linking to the main site introduced the following year, which would stay at the bottom-right corner of the screen at all times, angering many of the site’s 2 million users.

    In 1998, the company received $25 million from Japanese holding company SoftBank, and $5 million from Yahoo!. Later that year, it was listed in the Nasdaq stock exchange. The stock launch price was $17, which quickly surpassed the $100 mark as part of the dot-com bubble. The only problem was, the company was still losing money — at the tune of $8 million in the last quarter of 1998, to be more specific.

    In 1999, GeoCities was the third-most visited site on the web, and sold to Yahoo! for $3.57 billion in stock, changing its name to Yahoo! Geocities. At first, Yahoo!’s terms of service stated that Yahoo! owned all of the content and rights of GeoCities websites, but that was quickly changed following negative media attention.

    Later in 1999, Yahoo! took a step away from the neighborhood-based nature of the site by switching to site URLs based on the user’s registration name. By the end of the year 2000, the original neighborhood names were no longer used within the main site either. Those were steps in the opposite direction of where the internet was heading, with groups based on shared interests.

    In 2001, Yahoo! introduced premium plans, and imposed a data transfer limit of 4.2MB per hour on free accounts, making it impossible to reach a large audience for free, especially for graphically rich sites. By then, Blogger and Wikipedia were already around.

    Myspace, Facebook and Flickr later joined the Web 2.0 revolution, each bringing more reasons not to create or have a personal website. In addition, the WordPress launched in 2003, making the site creation and management tools of GeoCities look outdated.

    Big in Japan

    In April 2009, Yahoo! announced that it would shut down GeoCities in October of that same year, deleting the sites of everyone who hadn’t migrated to the paid Yahoo! Web Hosting service, and stopped accepting new members. The only exception was GeoCities Japan, part of Yahoo! Japan, which was a joint venture between SoftBank and Yahoo!

    GeoCities Japan remained alive for a decade longer than the main site.

    Following the announcement, the Internet Archive launched a project to save as many of GeoCities’ 38 million pages as possible. The unrelated Archive Team was also established in response to Yahoo!’s actions, and has since contributed to the preservation of content from several once-popular sites.

    In October 2018, Yahoo! Japan, which was no longer related to Yahoo!, announced that GeoCities Japan would finally be terminated in March 2019. The Archive Team then started a new project to preserve the site.

    Journey to the Past

    If you want to browse old GeoCities sites like you could in the era before the Yahoo! acquisition, based on neighborhoods and suburbs, you should visit Restorativland’s GeoCities Gallery.

    The SiliconValley neighborhood on the GeoCities Gallery.

    If you want to search for a more specific term, you should try GeoCities.ws, a spiritual successor to GeoCities that’s completely unrelated to the original company, with a quick-loading archive of GeoCities. The site offers a free hosting service plan under the name “homesteader.”

    The most thorough archive of old GeoCities sites can be found on OoCities. The site’s search function includes results from GeoCities.ws, and you can also search for a site by username, or by neighborhood and “street address.”

    Clearly, GeoCities earned its place in web history.

    Discussion topic for the comments: if you were around back in the 1990s, did you have your own website? Or when was the first time you had some presence online?

    TechSpot’s “What Ever Happened to…” Series

    The story of software apps and companies that at one point hit mainstream and were widely used, but are now gone. We cover the most prominent areas of their history, innovations, successes and controversies.

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    3 Web 3.0 Cryptos to Buy Ahead of a Major 2022 Boom

    Web 3.0 is becoming more unavoidable as the days go on. There’s more chatter each week about how Web 3.0 is the next revolution in the internet, and how our lives will be made much better through decentralization. Some think it’s all tech mumbo-jumbo, others think it’s the real deal. And, of course, crypto is expected to lead the charge for this new iteration of the web. As such, investors are seeking out the best Web 3.0 cryptos to buy before the wave crests.

    The concept of Web 3.0 is rooted in the idea that our current internet, Web 2.0, is becoming far too centralized. Sure, we got on-demand e-commerce platforms like Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN), powerful web oracles like Alphabet (NASDAQ:GOOG, NASDAQ:GOOGL) and social media juggernauts like Twitter (NYSE:TWTR). Yet, in the process, Web 3.0 bulls argue we gave these entities too much power. Now, we are becoming aware of just how much companies like Amazon and Meta Platforms (NASDAQ:FB) control our internet, our emotions and the way we interact together.

    Web 3.0 then will allow users to connect with one another through blockchain technology. The decentralized nature of the blockchain allows for entities like decentralized autonomous organizations (DAOs). These DAOs allow the users themselves to decide on what to change or what rules to enforce; thus, they drive a level of independence among end users. Moreover, Web 3.0 absolves companies like Amazon, whose Web Services suite powers roughly one-third of the entire internet, from their stranglehold on web infrastructure.

    This all sounds great, and it’s already happening all around us. The advent of crypto investing is helping to drive this new web. But, what projects can one invest in specifically to bank on Web 3.0? Consider these Web 3.0 cryptos to buy:

    • Chainlink (LINK-USD)
    • Audius (AUDIO-USD)
    • Flux (FLUX-USD)

    Web 3.0 Cryptos to Buy: Chainlink (LINK-USD)

    Source: Stanslavs / Shutterstock.com

    Chainlink is among the largest of Web 3.0 plays, existing long before the recent hype caught investors’ attention. The LINK token is the No. 22 crypto in the world, with a market capitalization of $7.5 billion. It has achieved this impressive valuation by offering a crucial service to DApp platforms that are leading the push into the new internet.

    The Chainlink network is what is called a blockchain abstraction layer. The network simplifies blockchain coding into a simple interface that allows data to flow freely across any number of blockchain networks. Essentially, Chainlink data can move from one project to another seamlessly through smart contracts. But what does Chainlink actually do with this ability? Well, as a decentralized oracle, Chainlink can independently supply a variety of data types to DApps. If an app needs accurate crypto market prices for a DeFi platform, they can fetch these prices in real time through Chainlink. If an app wants to offer an external payment method which the underlying network doesn’t offer, it can do this through Chainlink. Thanks to the project’s Associate Press partnership, one can even use Chainlink to supply users with real-time news feeds.

    One can look at Chainlink’s ecosystem page to see all of the integrations it has made in five years. It has been quite busy, partnering up with nearly 1,200 projects. Last fall, it made one of its biggest partnerships to date, teaming up with the burgeoning Cardano (ADA-USD) network as it starts rolling out smart contracts and DApps. If that’s not enough, the network is also planning on integrating its own DeFi functions this year by implementing LINK staking.

    Audius (AUDIO-USD)

    Concept art for the Audius (AUDIO) token.

    Source: Shutterstock

    Music streaming is a huge topic right now, thanks to recent Spotify (NYSE:SPOT) drama. The company has been in hot water over its fumbling of the Joe Rogan news. Spotify, which exclusively licenses Rogan’s podcast The Joe Rogan Experience, has failed to alleviate anger over complaints of Covid-19 vaccine misinformation. Now, it’s seeing a flight of artists from its platform, including Neil Young and Joni Mitchell. This isn’t the first time Spotify has drawn criticism either; it is constantly shunned for failing to pay musicians on its platform at a rate competitive with other streaming services.

    Enter Audius, the Web 3.0 player that wants to decentralize music streaming and put rewards into the hands of musicians and listeners alike. Audius, which runs on the Solana (SOL-USD) network, is one of the fastest-growing Web 3.0 platforms. Through Audius, one can listen to their favorite artists and ensure that they get more streaming revenue than other services offer. It also wants to reward the users themselves for creating network value; by listening to music on the platform, users can earn AUDIO tokens. Most prominently, AUDIO tokens are used for network governance, allowing users themselves to vote on changes to the network.

    In keeping with the decentralized theme of Web 3.0, Audius relies on two types of nodes for content distribution. Artists themselves supply their work to content nodes. These content nodes then provide users with high-quality music streaming. The artists also send content to the Audius content ledger. This ledger automatically indexes the content metadata and sends it to discovery nodes. The discovery nodes provide end users with content suggestions that help improve the Audius experience.

    Web 3.0 Cryptos to Buy: Flux (FLUX-USD)

    The Flux (FLUX) cryptocurrency logo on a white piece of fabric.

    Source: Shutterstock

    Flux is one of the hottest Web 3.0 cryptos to buy, with investors enthralled by the network’s promise of being the Amazon Web Services of the blockchain. It’s not quite as flashy as Web 3.0 music streaming, that’s for sure. But, it could very well prove to be one of the most important Web 3.0 projects as time goes on, providing the tools to build the next evolution of the internet.

    Flux most obviously stands to challenge Amazon Web Services as a decentralized server host. Amazon controls one-third of the internet with AWS, yet it oftentimes shows that it’s not fit for the job. The service sees several outages a year, which often brings down some of the most popular websites in the world. Flux can compete with this through its FluxNodes, which offer user-provided servers that promise better performance than competitors.

    FluxNode operators exist all over the world, and the number of nodes grows every month. These node operators provide computing power to the network; users can then use this computing power for server hosting, DApp and oracle deployment, and more. Since nodes are all over the globe, users nearly anywhere in the world have access to high-performing computing. In exchange, node operators receive FLUX coins, netting them passive income for their services.

    The network is fast heating up, with lots of support from investors. Since October, the coin grew over 450%, topping out at a $4.17 all-time high. Moreover, the network is getting support from some huge computing players. At the beginning of the year, the network announced a partnership with graphics procession unit (GPU) manufacturer Nvidia (NASDAQ:NVDA). The company is helping to push Flux development by putting the project in contact with Nvidia engineers and marketers.

    On the date of publication, Brenden Rearick did not have (either directly or indirectly) any positions in the securities mentioned in this article. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the writer, subject to the InvestorPlace.com Publishing Guidelines.